Hosta 'Spritzer'
 

Paul Aden of New York registered this plant as a hybrid of H. 'Aden No. 349' × H. 'Green Fountain' in 1986. It is a large size (22 inches high by around 30 inches wide) mound of foliage with a gold center and green margins. The leaves are narrowly ovate with slightly rippled margins and long, curved tips. Pale lavender flowers are borne from late August into September followed by viable seeds.

According to The Hostapedia by Mark Zilis (2009), this cultivar "...is widely known for its superb combination of gold-centered variegation and a flowing mound habit."

The New Encyclopedia of Hostas (2009) states: "Increases rapidly, but suited to container growing. Is, in effect, the centrally variegated form of H. 'Green Fountain'...subtly variegated leaves on a cascading mound."
 



 

"Long, pointed, lance-shaped leaves form a tall, wide spreading mound. Foliage grows upright and then bends over fountainlike. In early season, leaves have a golden green border encasing - and markedly contrasting with - patterns of yellow, white and often chartreuse streaks that comprise the wide center areas. Each leaf has a striking variegation, giving 'Spritzer' an eye-catching kaleidoscope of brightness. This hosta is most effective as a specimen plant. A rapid grower; in four years it will need at least a 3 foot diameter space to be best appreciated. (Disregard dimensions in most catalogues.) Foliage turns all green in midseason, a pleasingly colored foil for the bloom scapes and flowers. The thick scapes splay out from the crown in all directions, an archite3ctural appearance that nicely compliments the arching form of the leaf mound. The flowerheads are big and fat before they open, resulting in a shooting-star appearance spritzing from the crown. When the pinky lavender blooms open, they're large, plentiful, closely bunched together, and 180 degrees around the scapes; their overall appearance reminds me of fireworks exploding in the sky. The flowering, however, has a negative: if there is a downpour, the scapes become so heavy from the drenching rain that they lean over into the foliage and retain that shape thereafter."

 

"One of those medium-sized plants that grows out like a fountain. The foliage is long and tapered. In the spring the leaves are white-centered with a green edge, but the colors get more subtle as the season progresses. This hosta is a stunner sited near a boulder, on a slope, or next to a water feature. When it blooms, the lovely tall, lavender scapes droop gracefully and cast wonderful reflections if placed at water's edge."


 
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