Hosta 'Lemon Lime'
 

A rapid growing, medium size (12 inches high) hosta, 'Lemon Lime' is great for edging beds and borders. It was registered by Robert Savory of Savory's Gardens in Minnesota in 1977 as a seedling of H. venusta. The foliage is narrowly ovate shaped, slightly wavy and has thin textured. It bears bright purple flowers in July and may re-bloom in September.

The Book of Little Hostas by Kathy and Michael Shadrack (2010) says: "Very fast growing...A very easy to grow variety that will eventually get quite large if left undisturbed. Regular division yields plants to edge a bed or pathway...should be kept out of strong sunlight."

The New Encyclopedia of Hostas by Diana Grenfell (2009) states: "Origin: H. sieboldii var. sieboldii derivative...Does not tolerate sun. Vigorous, one of the fastest-growing hostas. Can easily exceed its registered dimensions. Three flushes of leaves may be produced each season. Some rebloom is possible in late summer if the first scapes are cut to the ground after flowering. Leaves maintain chartreuse unless the hosta is grown in bright light...Tall scapes rising above dense carpets of pointed leaves."

An article by Bob Solberg in The Hosta Journal (1994 Vol. 25 No. 2) states that "Bob Savory's 'Lemon Lime' and 'Golden Tiara', both registered in 1977, are hosta breakthroughs, but not because H. nakaina is their parent. (It is also the parent of many of Eunice Fisher's small-to-medium sized hybrids.) Rather it is because of their bright spring color and extremely fast rate of increase. 'Golden Tiara' is often listed as a H. nakaiana hybrid, as 'Lemon Lime' is, but it is really an induced mutation of a H. nakaiana seedling.

In an effort to create hostas that rapidly increased, seven hundred fifty H. nakaiana seedlings were treated with a mixture of hormones and vitamins. The sport of one of these seedlings was named 'Golden Tiara'. No hostas compare with these two of Savory's for rate of increase or repeat blooming throughout the season."

 
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