Although the colors of hosta flowers can be quite fetching, they are generally not high on the list of design considerations when selecting a plant for the garden. In fact, a fair number of gardeners do not like the flowers on hostas. They cut the flower scapes off as soon as they appear. Wow!

To register a hosta, you must describe the flower color as one of the following: pure white, near white, pale lavender, medium lavender, pale purple and deep purple. In books, catalogs and other references, you might see the flowers described as violet, cream-colored, bluish and other “non-official” descriptors.

H. plantaginea is probably the best example of a hosta with pure white flowers. Pure white flowers appear on only a few hosta cultivars or species.
 

Although many hostas seem to have white flowers, upon close up inspection, they almost always have a bit of pale lavender mixed in. Flowers of this color are called near white. Plants with H. sieboldiana or H. 'Tokudama' in their background will have this type of flower color.
 

By far, most hostas have some shade of lavender flowers ranging from the very pale H. montana types to the pale lavender of H. 'Undulata Erromena'.

This is deeper, richer shade of lavender which is found in such hostas as H. 'Antioch', H. 'Crusader', and H. 'Tall Boy' among others. Hostas from the Tardiana Group of plants have a distinctive shade of medium lavender in their flowers that appears to have a hint of blue in them.

Owing to the presence of some reddish pigment, a few species of hosta have purple flowers which range from pale to deep, dark purple.

Several species including H. sieboldii, H. ventricosa, H. capitata, and H. venusta have purple flowers in varying shades.
 

Almost all hosta flowers (except the pure whites) have a couple of colors in them. In some cases, the second color will form a distinctive stripe or shading that is especially noticeable when viewed up close. Others may have translucent tepal margins that give the effect of a bi-color bloom.

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