Hosta 'Ginko Craig'
 

This fast growing cultivar from Japan was registered by Jack Craig and Alex J. Summers of Delaware in 1986. The medium size (14 inches high by 44 inches wide) mound has moderately wavy foliage that is dull on top and slightly shiny beneath. It bears purple flowers from mid-August into September.

According to The Hostapedia by Mark Zilis (2009) this cultivar "...is commonly used for landscaping due to its fast growth rate, good flower performance, and attractive, white-margined foliage. In 1989 Peter Ruh of Ohio and I found that it was the same as "Hakama Gibōshi", i.e. H. 'Helonioides Albopicta'. Also, I suspect that a number of other listed cultivars are the same plant, including 'Bunchōkō', 'Excalibur', and 'Mr Asami Improved'."

Zilis also says, "For those unfamiliar with hosta names, there is always a temptation to correct "Ginko" to "Ginkgo", like the tree. The only problem is that Ginko Craig is a person, not a plant, and that is how her name is spelled."

She was Jack Craig's wife.

The Book of Little Hostas by Kathy and Michael Shadrack (2010) says: "A good border plant and suitable as a groundcover."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1991 Vol. 22 No. 1) states that, "The name on the label was 'Bunchoku', but according to W. George Schmid it should be 'Bunchoko'. This hosta looks like 'Ginko Craig'...H. 'Bunchoko' has dark purple blooms much darker and more handsome than 'Ginko Craig'...I confirmed this difference with our still blooming 'Ginko Craig' and also 'Princess of Karafuto' which is a 'Ginko Craig' look-alike."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1992 Vol. 23 No. 1) states that, "In spring 1991, visited Japan spending considerable time with hosta specialists. He reports that in Japan, "our" 'Ginko Craig' is labeled H. helenoides 'Albo-Picta', a variety described by Dr. Fumio Maekawa in his 1940 taxonomic monograph...this hosta was received by Alex Summers in 1969 from Jack Craig who was living in Japan. ..Summers called it 'Ginko Craig' honoring Jack Craig's then wife...What we have been growing as H. heloniodes 'Albo-picta' is actually H. rhodeifolia...what is the name of the hosta we have been calling H. rohdeifolia in the Western world? It's 'Fortunei Gloriosa'..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2004 Vol. 35 No.2) says, "If you've examined the 2003 hosta registrations...you noticed that Steven Chamberlain...registered a handful of cultivars with "odd" names. Well, not odd o Steve and other fanciers of J.R.R. Tolkein's classic epic trilogy of novels, The Lord of the Rings...All of Steve's Academy Middle-Earth Series are second generation (F2) open-pollinated seedlings of 'Ginko Craig'." Hostas in this series include:

1. H. 'Academy Celeborn' - Celeborn is an elven lord who was husband of Lady Galadriel.
2. H. 'Academy Galadriel' - Galadriel was the elven queen of Lórien who was the holder of one of the rings.
3. H. 'Academy Isengard' - Isengard is a circular fortress with a tall dark tower, Orrhanc, in the center.
4. H. 'Academy Palantir' - Plantirs are spheres that permitted instantaneous communications over long distances.
5. H. 'Academy Fanghorn Forest' - This is an ancient forest in Middle-earth.
6. H. 'Academy Nazgul' - The nine Nazgul were the chief servants of the dark lord, Sauron.
7. H. 'Academy Mallorn' - These are the largest trees found in Middle-earth






 
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