PAGE TOP

We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 13,300 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

  1. Blue Hostas
  2. 'Blue Mouse Ears'
  3. Early Hosta Cultivars
  4. Fall Bloomers
  5. Flowers
  6. Green Hostas
  7. Halcyon Group
  8. Hosta History
  9. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  9. Small Hostas
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

1) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Sum and Substance', "...clumps of this cultivar growing in more shade are the same size at the same age; have fewer, but larger, leaves; and lack the contested appearance...In addition to genes for heavy substance, large size and yellow leaves, the unknown parentage...includes genes for very dark green, almost black, leaves which are sometimes expressed in its seedlings."

2) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. montana 'Aureomarginata', "The species H. montana is common on the islands of Japan . Undoubtedly it has sported to the edge-variegated form numerous times, and it is likely that not all the forms of H. montana 'Aureomarginata' in commerce are identical."

3) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Leather Sheen, "Mark Zilis and Doug Lohman registered this cross between the giant 'Sum and Substance' and the tiny H. venusta in 1988. In maturity it makes a spreading carpet reflective of H. venusta, but with the thick substance of 'Sum and Substance' and dark green, shiny leaves."

4) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. venusta, "This is the smallest hosta species. Wild-collected examples of H. venusta vary considerably in size and appearance from this clone, which is the one widely available in commerce...tends to form a carpet rather than a clump as it matures."

5) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'King Tut, "Gretchen Harshbarger registered this hybrid of 'Tokudama Aureonebulosa' in 1981. It is a reliable yellow hosta with good substance and a hint of green that gives the leaves an unusual appearance. It also has proven to a useful pod parent in my hybridizing program."

6) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Brave Amherst', "William and Eleanor Lachman registered this cross of 'Christmas Tree' and 'Reversed' in 1993.. In maturity, it makes a large clump with impressive blue leaves that show a golden yellow margin of variable width."

7) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Fourth of July, " J.C. Taylor and Tony Avent registered this cultivar in 1993. As the clump matures, it forms a mound of cascading, elongated, medium green leaves that provide very interesting texture."

8) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Grand Prize', "Walters Gardens registered this wide-margined sport of 'Grand Tiara' in 1998. Since it is slightly stoloniferous (Mr PGC - Hostas are rhizomatous), it forms an every-widening low mound as it matures. For a time after the leaves emerge, the color contrast between the green center and yellow edge is particularly striking. Late in the summer, the leaf edges lighten to white."

9) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Jack of Diamonds', "Robert Savory registered this H. sieboldiana hybrid in 1985. Although smaller in both leaf size and ultimate clump size than 'Frances Williams', it shows all the desirable qualities of this famous cultivar."

10) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Deane's Dream', "Bob Solberg registered this cross between 'Blue Arrow' and 'Sea Fire' in 2000. It is a vigorous blue hosta in the garden. The light blue leaves hold their color well, at least until the plant blooms."

11) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Paradise Joyce', "The patented Marco Fransen cultivar is a sport of 'Halcyon' . It emerges with blue leaves that show little, if any, trace of the yellow center to come. As the season progresses, the leaf centers lighten depending upon the degree of sun exposure, reaching an appearance similar to 'June'. Late in the season, the leaf centers become creamy white. This large clump shows a division that has reverted to the all-blue 'Halcyon', which I shall have to remove."

12) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Wolverine', "Jim Wilkins registered this sport of a 'Dorset Blue' seedling in 1995. In the spring, there is beautiful contrast between the blue center and the creamy white margin. As the wax washes off, the center becomes a solid green."

13) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Bill Brincka', " William Brincka registered this selected clone of 'Opipara' in 1988. Although it has leaves of a size appropriate for a medium-sized hosta, it is strongly stoloniferous (Mr PGC - Hostas are rhizomatous) and forms a very large plant as it matures. The shiny green leaves emerge with a bright yellow margin that slowly lightens to white as the season progresses..."

14) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Dee's Golden Jewel', "Kevin Walek registered this cross of 'Royal Standard' and 'Galaxy' in 1996. In maturity, it has turned out to be a very large plant with a very congested habit. This hosta is an outstanding blue early in the season, but the leaves turn yellow later, even if there is only brief sun exposure each day. New leaves emerge blue, giving an unusual two-toned appearance to a vigorous clump."

15) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Striptease', "Rick and Criss Thompson registered this sport of 'Gold Standard' in 1991. Although the white streak between the leaf center and leaf margin made this cultivar famous, I find it almost too subtle to be a major part of the plant's character as it matures. It is, however, an incredibly vigorous cultivar and, with age, makes a striking large clump."

16) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Heartache', "Herb Benedict never registered this unusual medium-sized cultivar. Initially the leaves are light blue, but slowly they become gold as the season progresses, depending upon the amount of sun exposure."

17) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Deep Blue Sea', "Charles Seaver registered this 'Blue Moon' seedling in 1994. My plant was a gift from Charlie at the Hostas in Focus Festival in 1997. Early in the season this plant is an intense blue with extreme corrugation. By the time it blooms later in the season, the wax has washed off and the leaves are dark green and very shiny."

18) A Photo Essay article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) makes comments about H. 'Darwin's Standard', "This is an unregistered sport of 'Gold Standard' from Darwin Plants in Hillegom, the Netherlands. Although it has the same basic medio-variegated leaf pattern as its parent, the clump shape, leaf substance and ultimate appearance of the mature clump are quite different."

Copyrightę 2000 -