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We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 13,300 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

  1. Blue Hostas
  2. 'Blue Mouse Ears'
  3. Early Hosta Cultivars
  4. Fall Bloomers
  5. Flowers
  6. Green Hostas
  7. Halcyon Group
  8. Hosta History
  9. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  9. Small Hostas
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

1) An article about leaf color change by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1991 Vol. 22 No. 1) cites an extract from The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid on seasonal changes in hosta leaf colors:

Viridescence Emerging with yellow or whitish color that ultimately become increasingly green. An example is H. 'Fortunei Albopicta' whose green-bordered leaves have a beautiful, bright yellow-colored center in the spring that turns to green by midseason.
Partial Viridescence Emerging with yellow or whitish color that turns to chartreuse (yellowish green), sometimes a dark chartreuse. One example is H. 'Kabitan'; two others are 'Golden Scepter'...and the center leaf coloring of 'Golden Tiara' .
Lutescence Emerging green or chartreuse and turning yellow or whitish yellow. The coloring of leaf centers of 'Gold Standard' ...is an example.
Albescence Yellow, yellowish green or green areas that turn to near white. Examples are the center leaf coloring of 'Janet'...and the margins of 'Antioch'...and H. ventricosa 'Aureomarginata'.

2) An article about H. 'Great Expectations' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 2) states that, "Everyone has great expectations for 'Great Expectations' . It is the great hosta dream (probably throughout the world) to grow a big, handsome specimen clump of 'Great Expectations'. But it doesn't do well for everyone...About half the people responding to my call for personal experiences say they have or have had problems growing it. The others say it is doing "fine" and cite the growing conditions...There is no consensus yet other than 'Great Expectations' :
bullet is a slow grower,
bullet forms an open clump (not a tight mound), and
bullet doesn't have leaves that exhibit the undesirable characteristic called "burning," "scalding," "browning," or "rusting" as does 'Color Glory' (a.k.a., 'Borwick Beauty'), which also is a sport with a bold bue-green border of H. sieboldiana 'Elegans.

3) An article about H. 'Aurora Borealis' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "Most, if not all, of the descriptions of this cultivar state it emerges from the ground three weeks later than does 'Frances Williams'. This is incorrect. It emerges perhaps three days later, if that. I am responsible for the error."

4) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Blue Blush' is described in nursery catalogues as "small" or "dwarf." In fact, when mature it is neither small nor dwarf. As a young plant, 'Blue Blush' is small, perhaps an 8-inch mound. But after about 5 or so years, it takes off and becomes a medium size plant. The 'Blue Blush' registration by the British Hosta and Hemerocallis Society if for a young - not mature - plant...Sandra Bond says that if you want to keep 'Blue Blush' small, keep dividing it. She adds that 'Hadspen Heron', another in the Tardiana Group, responds in the same way."

5) An article by David H. Stevenson, Hosta Registrar in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "Flowering times of a given cultivar or species vary significantly from region to region...The intent is for those using these descriptions to be able to judge flowering time of a given cultivar against common species which they might have in their own gardens."

6) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1998 Vol. 29 No. 1) discusses the fact that many variegated hosta cultivars are considered "unstable." This means that all or individual divisions of the clump may revert to either a solid color or other form of variegation. You may end up suddenly have a single colored hosta or you will need to separate a solid colored division from the clump. Three nurseries were cited who include notations about "Unstable" hostas. The following is a composite list of those cultivars mentioned:

7) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. montana 'Auroeomarginata' (AHS - 87). With its wide gold border, this large hosta is a harbinger of spring, but note that because it emerges from the ground very early it can get nipped by frost."

8) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Diamond Tiara' (Zilis - 85). This is my favorite member of the Tiara Group because its green leaves having a white border don't lose their pizzazz and become blah as do its siblings, such as H. 'Golden Tiara' (Savory - 77) and the gold leaved H. 'Golden Scepter' (Savory - 83) in my garden come summertime."

9) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Brim Cup' (Aden - 86)...Many gardeners report this hosta is hard to grow. There is tearing of the wide gold borders, normal to the green center, as the leaves emerge during spring growth. This is believed due to the tensile stresses that develop between the border and center coloring when the leaves develop their deep bowl shape. I find that heavy fertilization promotes this ugly appearance. A well grown 'Brim Cup' is a very handsome hosta, well worth experimenting with."

10) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Great Expectations' (John Bond is originator; Paul Aden named and introduced it - 88). When attendees to the 1997 AHS National Convention in Indianapolis saw the 'Great Expectations' clumps in the tour gardens, many couldn't believe how huge they were...This led to much discussion on why this hosta does well in some gardens and not in others...H. 'Great Expectations' and H. 'Dream Weaver' both have green or bluish green leaves. The difference is the variegation...H. 'Great Expectations' has a prominent "maple-leaf-like" (for lack of a better descriptive term) pattern in the leaf center and the creamer center variegation...The center leaf pattern of H. 'Dream Weaver', on the other hand, is more "spear-like" with more than 1/2, often as much as 2/3, of the leaf surface being green or bluish green."

11) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Inniswood' (Inniswood Metro Gardens - IAC)...I find this hosta to be slow growing, but a large specimen is a show stopper."

12) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2000 Vol. 31 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Sum and Substance' (Aden - 80)...This hosta's magnificence is site-specific, needing quite a bit of sun to look its best."

13) An article about H. 'Uzo-no-Mai' by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "One tiny hosta has caused more consternation and disappointment among gardeners than any other: H. 'Uzo-no-Mai'...Liberally translated, the Japanese name means "dancing eddy." When one views the plant from the top, with some imagination, the leaves look like a whirlpool. Mark Zilis gives the sad results...writing "I have seen it die in both gardens and containers."

14) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2003 Vol. 34 No. 1) states that, "In my view, boat-shaped or "keeled" is a better descriptor than folded. The leaf blade curves upward from the midrib similar to how a canoe looks...H. 'Stetson', 'Cowrie', 'Banana Boat', and 'Blue Canoe' are some other hostas with this folded or keeled leaf shape."

15) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2003 Vol. 34 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Sum and Substance' is believed to be an open-pollinated seedling of H. nigrescens 'Elatior' and, according to Ben J.M. Zonneveld, of the Netherlands it may be a triploid."

16) An article  by C.H. Falstad about the stability of colors in hosta leaves in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "However, in a variegated plant, when the cells don't stay in place, the leaves can end up all one color, as when 'Guacamole'...goes back to 'Fried Green Tomatoes'...In rare instances, a complete pattern reversal can occur, as with 'Flame Stitch'...from H. ventricosa 'Aureomarginata'...and 'Eskimo Pie'...from 'Northern Exposure'..."

17) An article  by C.H. Falstad about the stability of colors in hosta leaves in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "The least stable hostas tend to be those with streaked leaves...In September, 1982 I found the first streaked forms of 'Krossa Regal'...Today, more than 20 years later, most of those clumps remain predominately streaked...In comparison, I once owned a plant of 'Yellow Splash'...Within a year or two, it turned entirely into 'Yellow Splash Rim'..."

18) An article  by C.H. Falstad about the stability of colors in hosta leaves in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "Some plants, like the streaked form of 'Fragrant Bouquet'...appear to stabilize so quickly to a margined variegation that few if any hosta collectors who ordered the streaked form have ever seen it. If indeed the streaked form was sent to them, it's joked that it stabilized while being shipped in the mail."

19) An article  by C.H. Falstad about the stability of colors in hosta leaves in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "For some reason, cultivars in the H. fortunei Group, in  particular 'Fortunei Hyacinthina' are much more prone to sporting than most other varieties. These hostas are the source of some of the early-found, popular variegated sports including 'Francee'...and 'Gold Standard' ...and some more recent finds such as 'Striptease'..."

20) An article  by C.H. Falstad about the stability of colors in hosta leaves in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "Other plants tend not to sport often. Take for example 'Dorset Blue'...In the tens of thousands of plants propagated at Walters Gardens, I have seen only one sport in our stock."

21) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No. 2) quotes W. George Schmid: "H. 'Tsugaru Komachi' ('The Little Maiden from Tsugaru')...is variegated but unstable. Though [the green form] is most commonly known by 'Aoba Komachi' [Ao means "green" and Aoba means green leaf], this name may not be specific enough because there are other all-green hostas that look just like the reverted, green form of 'Tsugaru Komachi'...My opinion is it should be 'Aoba Tsugaru Komanchi' to indicate it is specifically the green reversion of 'Tsugaru Komachi'."

22) An article by Kevin Walek in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No. 2) states that, "H. 'Candy Dish' and its pod parent, 'Urajiro Hachijo', probably a form of H. longipes, both show potential for breeding outstanding piecrusted cultivars...Think about how many people coveted 'Donahue Piecrust' for its wavy edge and coloration. Now think about the same look on a much smaller leaf, with a much smaller and tighter clump. You can imagine the possibilities."

23) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No. 2) states that, "Paul Aden in The Hosta Book mentioned that medio-variegated hostas develop plain-leaved forms more readily than margin-variegated hostas. My observations are that 'Revolution' develops all-green leaves more readily than 'Independence' does. Apparently this is to be expected because 'Revolution' has more white tissue than 'Independence' -- and it's white tissue that wants to "re-green"."

24) An article by Ben J.M. ZonneveldWarren I. Pollock , Rob Mortko and Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 1) states that, "Every few years, a totally new kind of hosta cultivar appears. Hosta 'Stitch in Time'...is such a cultivar...Why 'Stitch in Time' has this unusual leaf structure is a mystery. Also a mystery is why, in propagation...by tissue culture, the percent of true-to-type plants is abnormally low; there is an uncustomarily large number of solid green and solid yellow culls.

25) An article by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 2) states that, "In 2007, I published a survival strategy for one of the most challenging, yet fascinating and unique hostas under the sun: Hosta 'Uzu-no-Mai'...This cute little cultivar requires very exacting cultural requirements to remain a bundle of joy in a pot."

26) An article by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 2) states that, "...'Tortifrons'. This is yet another of the "difficult ones."...We think 'Tortifrons' was originally found as a wild sport. It has been in Japanese cultivation for many years but it has never been located in the wild."

27) An article by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 3) states that, "Hosta 'Tattoo' is one of the most unusual hostas on the planet. Some successful gardeners grow it well and just love it, but others consider it their nemesis...Tony Avent's Plant Delights Nursery offers a number of unusual hosta cultivars with even more unusual names, such as 'Get Nekkid', 'Banana Puddin' and 'Tattoo'...Considering the fact that 'Tattoo' has 'Tokudama' in its background, expected slow growth and I got it...Before I got 'Tattoo' number 2, I decided to look around for it when visiting gardens here (Georgia) and in other states...My research made one important fact clear to me: All of the "successful" gardeners grew 'Tattoo' in pots sitting in a water-containing saucer or in pots with a built-in bottom that holds water. That technique was so successful that some gardeners here in the South even brought potted 'Tattoo' plants through our drought."

28) An article by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 3) states that, "Over the last 40 years I have learned that any plant with H. sieboldiana or 'Tokudama' in its background cannot stand drought."

29) An article discussing H. 'Sum and Substance' by Walter Cullerton in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) states that, "...not one of my favorite hostas...at an AHS Convention...I was sitting next to a young chap from across the pond...He asked me if I liked vase shaped hostas, and I quickly responded, "Yes, absolutely." He then suggested that I grow 'Sum and Substance' as a three- to five-crown plant. When I got home, I proceeded to follow his suggestion and placed the plant in a 10 gallon or so terracotta planter...Wow! Ever since then, I've kept "ole S&S" in that planer, culling out several new crowns every spring to maintain the three to five crowns and the wonderful vase shape."

30) An article about H. 'Empress Wu' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2011 Vol. 42 No. 1) quotes Brian Skaggs:  "It is one of the first up...and one of the first to flower. Go figure! What is really nice is that 'Empress Wu' holds her flowers right at or just above the loftiest leaves. (One H. 'Elatior' in the world is enough!). For the hybridizer, she keeps pumping flower scapes over a long period. How sweet!...Also, the dogs very much enjoy the cool soil in her high shade on a warm summer day."

31) An article by Rick Goodenough in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 1) states that, “H.Scalloped Potatoes’ wears its piecrusting proudly on rounded, deeply veined leaves that are held upright on a large, mature specimen.”

32) An article by Rick Goodenough in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 1) states that, “H.Belmont Stakes’ is just plain pretty with its wonderfully wide, neat and tidy cream-white edges…makes a very tidy border specimen.”

33) An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No.2) states that, "During the 50 or so years that 'Francee', a diploid...has been cultivated, some 75 sport descendents have been reported. About 20 are diploid and for the most part of lesser interest...the tetraploid sports...have been of principal attention. Examples are first generation H. 'Patriot' that sported...H. 'Loyalist' that sported...H. 'Revolution that sported...H. 'Independence'...H. 'Minuteman' and H. 'Pathfinder'...sported several tetraploid second generations of commercial interest."

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