We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 13,300 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

  1. Blue Hostas
  2. 'Blue Mouse Ears'
  3. Early Hosta Cultivars
  4. Fall Bloomers
  5. Flowers
  6. Green Hostas
  7. Halcyon Group
  8. Hosta History
  9. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  9. Small Hostas
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

1) In answer to a question about growing smaller hostas that appeared in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 2), Chuck & Sue Anderson of Mason Hollow Nursery in New Hampshire made the following comment, "H. 'Cracker Crumbs', 'Cookie Crumbs' and 'Surfer Girl' are a little thinner on the substance and maybe not quite as drought tolerant, but what an awesome 4-to-6-inch-high, weed-choking mat they can form."

2) In answer to a question about growing smaller hostas that appeared in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 2), Chuck & Sue Anderson of Mason Hollow Nursery in New Hampshire made the following comment, "H. 'Pandora's Box' is one many people report trouble growing. We used to plant it near the fronts of borders and it never made it. Put in a raised bed, rock garden-like environment, 'Pandora's Box' is spectacular."

3) In answer to a question about growing smaller hostas that appeared in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 2), Chuck & Sue Anderson of Mason Hollow Nursery in New Hampshire made the following comment, "H. 'Cat's Eye' is so small that it gets lost in the garden. Plant it in a crevice between rocks with well-drained gravelly soil or in a planter."

4) In answer to a question about growing smaller hostas that appeared in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 2), W. George Schmid of Georgia, author of The Genus Hosta (1991) commented, "My favorite minis are H. venusta, H. gracillima, a white-margined sport of H. gracillima named 'Kifukurin Ko Mame', H. pulchella and 'Blue Mouse Ears' ."

5) In answer to a question about growing smaller hostas that appeared in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 2), Sandie Markland of North Carolina commented, "There two smaller hostas that really stand out among the many I have grown over the years: H. 'Gay Blade' and the truly diminutive, 'Gaijin'...I have grown both of these beauties for the past 15 years and still have the original plants I purchased as a budding collector in 1997. I think that really says something about the plant!"

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