PAGE TOP

We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 13,300 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

  1. Blue Hostas
  2. 'Blue Mouse Ears'
  3. Early Hosta Cultivars
  4. Fall Bloomers
  5. Flowers
  6. Green Hostas
  7. Halcyon Group
  8. Hosta History
  9. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  9. Small Hostas
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

1) An article by Ben J.M. Zonneveld of the Netherlands in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 2) states that, "A possible new species of the genus Hosta has been found in China in 1989. Some time ago, I went to the famous Leiden Herbarium...One of the interesting finds was a description of H. albofarinosa...From the Latin description, it seems to be a plant similar to H. ventricosa, except both sides of the leaf are white powdered and it has upright flowers. The leaf blade is 13-20 cm (5 to 8 inches) x 6-9 cm (2 to 3˝ inches) with 5-7 veins. The scape is about 40 cm (16 inches) high with 10 flowers. There are 1-2 leafy, sterile bracts 5-10 cm (2-4 inches) long and 1-1.5 cm (1/3 to 1/2 inches) broad. The large, purple-striped white flower is not fragrant. The 6 stamens have yellow anthers. It is found in the province of Anhui, Xiuning County at 800 m (2624 feet) elevation above sea level...we should try to get hold of the plant alive or dead to study it in more detail to find out whether it is a particularly good species."

2) An article in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 1) reporting on a speech by Barry Yinger at the 2001 AHS Convention states "One hosta species in particular, H. rectifolia, which forms an upright mound of lance-shaped green leaves and has purple flowers, has a cult following in Japan . These avid sport hunters have found hundreds of sports in the wild. These sports which are not cultivated in the U.S. come in the whole spectrum of hosta colors...However, the crowning jewel, H. rectifolia 'Mito-no-Hana', which had green leaves with silver-white veins that caused a gasp of "Wow" from the crowd."

3) An article by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "Among the most remarkable species is H. pycnophylla. Bob Olson would call it "a white-backed-leaf little devil-to-grow plant." Despite how difficult it is to grow, it has become a favored source of genetic material because its leaves have a very chalky white back. It is rare in the wild and not east to find or get to."

4) An article about growing H. pycnophylla by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "...1) In the South, H. pycnophylla needs mostly morning sun in spring and shade in summer...in the North, it needs more sun than shade all day in both spring and summer. This species is very shy about flowering if it does not get enough sun...2) As with all relatives of H. longipes, the plant does best if you supply plenty of water...particularly during summer drought periods. 3) In the North, plant this species in an open location facing south or southeast to gain additional growing season...since this is a southern, long-growing-season species that requires plenty of moisture and warmth (even heat) to flower and set seed."

5) An article by Bill Meyer in The Hosta Journal (2003 Vol. 34 No. 1) states that, "H. sieboldiana...Virtually the opposite of H. sieboldii, they add large leaves, rounded leaf shapes, rugosity and heavy substance. They are also the origin of the wax that makes green hostas appear blue and of lutescent yellow coloring (all other species produce viridescent yellow seedlings). Like H. sieboldii, they yield large quantities of seed...Slow growth and poor division formation are at the top of the list of negative traits. In addition, they flower early, at a time when few other species bloom, often adapt poorly to hotter climates, go dormant in the summer and lack new leaf production during the second half of the season. Some would consider them overused."

6) An article by Glenn Herold in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "Korea has eight native hosta species: Hosta capitata, H. clausa, H. jonesii, H. laevigata, H. minor, H. tsushimensis, H. venusta and H . yingeri. H. laevigata is closely related to H. yingeri, H. minor is closely related to H. venusta, and H. tsushimensis is closely related to H. jonesii."

7) An article by Glenn Herold in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "H. yingeri is found only on the islands of Taehuksan and Sohuksan off the southwest coast of Korea...It was discovered in 1984 by plant collector Barry Yinger...H. yingeri is used extensively in breeding, especially by hybridizers Bob Solberg, Tony Avent, Greg Johnson, Don Dean and Roy Herold.

8) An article by Steve Chamberlain in The Hosta Journal (2014 Vol. 45 No. 2) states that, "Of the species in genus Hosta, there is only one natural tetraploid -- H. ventricosa. This species and its garden sports...are good garden plants with large flowers and seed pods. The species comes true from seed, although its pollen has been used to produce hybrids. It is likely that H. ventricosa embodies one of the benefits of being tetraploid -- the substitution of asexual for sexual reproduction."

9) An article by Glenn Herold in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "Korea has eight native hosta species: Hosta capitata, H. clausa, H. jonesii, H. laevigata, H. minor, H. tsushimensis, H. venusta and H . yingeri. H. laevigata is closely related to H. yingeri, H. minor is closely related to H. venusta, and H. tsushimensis is closely related to H. jonesii."

Copyright© 2000 -