Fall Blooming Hostas

We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 12,000 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

     
  1. Blue Hostas
  2. Early Hosta Cultivars
  3. Fall Bloomers
  4. Flowers
  5. Green Hostas
  6. Halcyon Group
  7. Hosta History
  8. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

An article about Fall Bloomers by Herb Benedict and Jim Wilkins in The Hosta Journal (1991 Vol. 22 No. 1) states that, "Here are some of the fall blooming plants we grow...(listed in the order of bloom times in Michigan).

1) H. kikutii A medium size plant densely flowering with white blooms. The flowers are equally arranged around the central axis of the raceme so that the bloom scapes resembles a bottle brush or pony tail...We are growing two named varieties, 'Hirao-59' and 'Finlandia'.
2) H. 'Fall Bouquet' Small, green plant, leaves slightly undulated, lavender scape and blooms, floriferous.
3) H. longipes Small green plant, densely flowering with a tall stiff bloom scape. The flowers are lavender and the leaves are green.
4) H. gracillima Funnel-shaped, light lavender flowers. A miniature green plant, with shiny surface.
5) H. 'Iwa Soules' Iwa means rock, and this plant was imported by Marjorie Soules, from Japan . It is a small green plant with lavender flowers.
6) H. tortifrons In the same section (Picnolepis) as H. longipes and H. rupifraga . Distinctive small plant, with twisted green leaves and lavender flowers.
7) H. 'Fused Veins' Small, green leaves often with ¼ inch margin which is a lighter green. The lance shaped leaves are undulated and the veins come together regularly. The flowers are mauve and the scape is sometimes branched.
8) H. rupifraga Small, medium green, with thick, leathery, ovate leaves. Densely flowering with purple flowers. 'Urajiro', 'Grand Slam', 'Maruba Iwa'
9) H. tardiflora   This small hosta is the last to bloom for us. Its leaves are shiny, dark green and lance shaped. The flowers are light lavender and borne in abundance on 12 inch scapes.

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows: H. tortifrons is now H. 'Tortifrons' and H. tardiflora is H. 'Tardiflora'.

An article about Fall Bloomers by Herb Benedict and Jim Wilkins in The Hosta Journal (1991 Vol. 22 No. 1) includes their observations about using fall blooming hostas in hybridizing programs:

1) H. tardiflora  × self Tends to flower 2 weeks earlier. 90% of the progeny have the flowers secund (flowers all on one side of the bloom stalk) and in 10% they are evenly arranged around the central axis of the raceme (nonsecund).
2) H. rupifraga × H. tardiflora Beautiful very tough plant with a taller bloom stalk. Blooms 2 weeks earlier.
3) H. 'Maruba Iwa' × H. tardiflora Taller bloom stalk. Blooms 2 weeks earlier. 30% of progeny have nonsecunded flowers.
4) H. gracillima × H. tardiflora Very nice small plant, with leaves intermediate between the two. Beautiful flowers.
5) H. rupifraga × H. kikutii   The best of this cross is called 'Roys Pink'. It is a perfect intermediate. The leaf is long, heart shaped and very thick. The flowers are pony tail in type, a light pinkish color and spent flowers drop off cleanly.

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows:  H. tardiflora is now H. 'Tardiflora'.

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