Hosta Names

We have searched our copies of The Hosta Journal for anything that might relate to any of the over 12,000 hosta names in our database. We extracted parts of articles that dealt with historical matters, opinions of well-known hostaphiles, recommendations (positive or negative), lookalike cultivars and the seemingly never ending problem with confusing names.

Where appropriate, we placed a copy of the material on the individual cultivar or species page. We also put the information and quotations on a group of topic pages listed below:

     
  1. Blue Hostas
  2. Early Hosta Cultivars
  3. Fall Bloomers
  4. Flowers
  5. Green Hostas
  6. Halcyon Group
  7. Hosta History
  8. Hybridizing
  1. Japanese Words
  2. Large Hostas
  3. Look-a-Like Hostas
  4. Hosta Names
  5. Non-US Hostas
  6. Photo Essays
  7. Plant Traits
  8. Hosta Series
  1. Hosta Species
  2. Top Rated Hostas
  3. Unstable Variegation
  4. White Margin Hostas
  5. White Medial Hostas
  6. Yellow Hostas
  7. Yellow Margin Hostas
  8. Yellow Medial Hostas

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that he has formulated two hosta nomenclature "laws" namely, "IF A HOSTA CAN HAVE TWO OR MORE NAMES, IT WILL. IF TWO OR MORE HOSTAS CAN HAVE THE SAME NAME, THEY WILL."

n article about H. 'Antioch' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "Chet Tompkins of Canby, Oregon believes he can trace this hosta to one of his mother's plants dating back to 1928...Among the several hosta varieties that his mother sold to the old Wayside Gardens of Mentor, Ohio, from 1936 to 1940, one had the designation "1928 #7 W.E." (W.E. meant White Edged.) Most assuredly this hosta is the one we now call H. 'Antioch'...I have a copy of the 1973 Wayside Gardens' catalogue and it lists "H. fortunei aurea marmorta"...another example where nursery people -- not botanists -- have given a Latin botanical name to a hosta..."aurea marmorta" means "marbled with gold"...Chet Tompkins' mother's "1928 #7 W.E." became "H. fortunei Aurea Marmorata" which gave way to H. 'Antioch'."

An article about H. 'Aureafolia' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "Carl Starker of Oregon gave this name to Chet Tompkins' mother's "1928 #11 W.E.)...Starker like to use these leaves in his floral arrangements. Tompkins has name his hosta 'Laella'..."

An article about H. tokudama 'Flavoplanata'  by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "Prof. Dress states that the "planata" part of this epithet is not Latin; that is, there is no such word or form in Latin, so far as he can determine."

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows: H. tokudama 'Flavoplanata' is now H. 'Tokudama Flavoplanata'.

An article about H. sieboldiana 'Semperaurea' by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "Through the kind cooperation of Mrs. Ursula Syre-Herz of Coastal Gardens and Nursery in Myrtle Beach, SC, I was able to obtain all of the pertinent information from three of Foerster's books in her possession. All of the Books mention 'Dauergoldfunkie', the German name for H. sieboldiana 'Semperaurea'...Foerster's books were published before 1959, and thus the Latin cultivar name 'Semperaurea' is permissible under the Cultivated Code."

An article about H. ventricosa 'Aureo-maculata' and 'Aureo-marginata' by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "H. ventricosa is one of the oldest hostas in cultivation...The variegated form of H. ventricosa that is now identified with the cultivar name of 'Aureo-marculata' can be traced back to P.F. von Siebold's time. In 1876, E. Regel published a paper on hostas in Germany and in it referred to a "Funkia ovata forma aureovariegata."...as a possible synonym for 'Aureo-maculata' form."

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows: H. ventricosa 'Aureomaculata' and H. ventricosa 'Aureomarginata'.

An article about H. ventricosa 'Aureo-maculata' and 'Aureo-marginata' by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "While the historical existence of H. ventricosa 'Aureo-maculata' can be considered confirmed, it is considerably more difficult to show that there was a H. ventricosa 'Aureo-marginata' before the 1950's."

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows: H. ventricosa 'Aureomaculata' and H. ventricosa 'Aureomarginata'.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that he has formulated two hosta nomenclature "laws" namely, "IF A HOSTA CAN HAVE TWO OR MORE NAMES, IT WILL. IF TWO OR MORE HOSTAS CAN HAVE THE SAME NAME, THEY WILL."

An article by Marvin C. Eisel, Hosta Registrar in The Hosta Journal (1985 Vol. 16) states that, "In the Fall 1984 AHS Newsletter, page 12, I reported that I had registered in the name of The American Hosta Society, the cultivar name 'Golden Sunburst' for the golden forms of H. sieboldiana 'Frances Williams' and 'Golden Medallion' for all the golden mutations of H. tokudama."

Note: Nomenclature changes recommended in the 1991 book The Genus Hosta by W. George Schmid and accepted by The American Hosta Society would update names as follows: H. tokudama is now H. 'Tokudama'

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1992 Vol. 23 No. 1) states that, "In spring 1991, visited Japan spending considerable time with hosta specialists. He reports that in Japan, "our" 'Ginko Craig' is labeled H. helenoides 'Albo-Picta', a variety described by Dr. Fumio Maekawa in his 1940 taxonomic monograph...this hosta was received by Alex Summers in 1969 from Jack Craig who was living in Japan ...Summers called it 'Ginko Craig' honoring Jack Craig's then wife...What we have been growing as H. heloniodes 'Albo-picta' is actually H. rhodeifolia...what is the name of the hosta we have been calling H. rohdeifolia in the Western world? It's 'Fortunei Gloriosa'..." 

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1992 Vol. 23 No. 2) states that, "H. 'Flamboyant' with its streaked variegation was a "must have" hosta at that time. The problem was that many who purchased it found that it started to turn - and in many cases had completely turned into 'Shade Fanfare' a year or two later."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1992 Vol. 23 No. 2) states that, "What's the problem with 'Northern Halo'? Simply, there are several forms. The form that people seem to want most has been difficult to obtain and lately has commanded a premium price." Pollock goes on to explain that the differences in forms of 'Northern Halo' have mostly to do with the width of the margin variegation and the size and shape of the leaves which varied from the original plant. These variations have probably occurred due to lack of quality control at various TC labs. To solve the problem, the originator of H. 'Northern Halo' has propagated it with the "proper" form and sells it as H. 'Northern Exposure'."

An article about H. 'Brother Ronald' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1995 Vol. 26 No. 2) states that, "...named for Eric Smith 's brother, Ronald by the British Hosta and Hemerocallis Society. Brother Ronald was neither a monk or friar."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1995 Vol. 26 No. 2) states that, "...seeing the new cultivar name 'Masquerade' instead of the invalid name "H. venusta 'Variegated' "...this hosta is not a venusta...H. 'Masquerade' is an apt name...because this hosta has been masquerading under an incorrect and invalid name."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1995 Vol. 26 No. 2) states that, "...seeing the new cultivar name 'Fool's Gold' instead of the invalid names " 'Fortunei Stenantha Variegated' " and "H. fortunei 'Stenantha Variegated'." They're invalid because a cultivar name cannot contain both Latin and English words."

An article by Alex Summers in The Hosta Journal (1995 Vol. 26 No. 2) states that, "H. 'Frances Williams' was registered...without detailed description or photos...the plant was discovered in 1936 by Mrs. Frances Williams...in rows of H. sieboldiana 'Elegans' at Bristol Nurseries in Bristol, Connecticut...Frances Williams sent a division to the University Botanic Garden in Oxford, England in 1959. It was named by George Robinson at a Royal Horticultural Society lecture on variegated plants."

An article about H. 'Golden Guernsey' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 1) states that, "It was know for some time as 'Golden High Fat Cream', but this is an invalid name (at the time)...The 1992 registration was spelled 'Golden Gurnsey', an orthographic error. Ruh requested that change to 'Golden Guernsey'...Guernsey is a Channel Island in the English Channel.

An article about H. 'Undulata' and its origins by Bob Solberg in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Undulata' is an interpsecific hybrid of H. sieboldii x H. montana collected from the wild and cultivated near Nagasaki in Japan . The variegation is a typical type produced by H. sieboldii . Plant size, leaf size, leaf vein count, scape height, flower color and bloom time are intermediate between H. montana and H. sieboldii . Purple anthers are probably from H. montana and undulating leaf margins from H. sieboldii...While the data presented here strongly support these conclusions, they do not provide absolute proof. DNA testing of these cultivars would prove very interesting."

An article about H. 'Undulata' and its origins by Bob Solberg in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Undulata Albomarginata' is an interspecific hybrid of H. sieboldii x H. montana but of different individual parentage than H. 'Undulata' . It was probably sold to Thomas Hogg in 1875 in Yokohama, Japan . It is not a sport of H. 'Undulata' or H. 'Undulata Erromena', the white-edged sport of the latter being H. 'See Saw'...While the data presented here strongly support these conclusions, they do not provide absolute proof. DNA testing of these cultivars would prove very interesting."

An article about name changes by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 2) states that, "Transliterated Japanese names which contain substantive words do not require changes. For example H. 'Akebono Tokudama' listed in Grenfell (1996) is an acceptable name because Akebono means "dawn" (of the day) and is a substantive. Other examples of such names are H. 'Hakujima' (a place name) and H. 'Umezawa' (a person's name.)."

An article about name changes by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (1996 Vol. 27 No. 2) states that, "The Latin name of the species may be omitted, because the cultivar name already includes the vernacular Japanese name of the species. Thus, H. pycnophylla 'Ogon Setouchi' may be abbreviated to H. 'Ogon Setouchi' or H. longipes 'Urajiro Iwa' may be shortened to H. 'Urajiro Iwa'..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "In 1995 Robert M. (Bob) Solberg...registered 'Saint Elmo's Fire'...to be correct, "Saint" should not be abbreviated to "St." in the name...is named for the patron saint of sailors. The "fire" is actually discharges of electricity that occur during storms, especially over large bodies of water."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "...The International Registration Authority [IRA] for Hosta permits cultivars having the same lineage and identical, or at least very similar, descriptions to be registered with different cultivar names. For registration purpose, they are assumed to be different cultivars until study shows they are the "same" hosta and should bear just one name..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 2) states that, "Bob Kuk named this plant for his mother...H. 'Josephine' is relatively unstable. It sports to two different hostas. One has leaves that are all green that he named 'Joseph' after Joe Duale, his stepfather...The other sport he named 'Queen Josephine'...it has green leaves with a wide margin, yellow when it emerges and then becoming creamy white. There is often some slight streaking of the margin toward the midrib...Both 'Joseph' and 'Queen Josephine' are exceptional in that they have very shiny, glossy leaves."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1998 Vol. 29 No. 1) states that, "...I'm told there are nurseries that list H. 'Neat Splash' but actually sell and ship H. 'Neat Splash Rim'..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1998 Vol. 29 No. 1) states that "Don Stevens was a retired school teacher in the Boston area, noted for his hybridization of daylilies...he thought he would try his hand with hostas. Needing seeds and knowing of Mildred Seaver...he purchased the H. 'Neat Splash' seeds from her...After germinating them and growing them on for a while, he...asked her to grow on the hosta ones. She did. Not long afterward in 1983, Don Stevens died. Of the H. 'Neat Splash' lot, she selected the best and named it for him."  The original plant was streaked but it soon settled into a hosta with a yellow marginal variegation.

An article about H. 'Ani Machi' and H. 'Geisha' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2001 Vol. 32 No. 1) states that H. 'Ani Machi' according to Mark Zillis' book The Hosta Handbook (2000)  "is the same plant that has been sold as H. 'Geisha'. It is not, however, the plant that Kevin Vaughn registered under this name in 1983." Vaughn registered a much smaller plant that what is in the trade today as H. 'Geisha'...he confirmed that what is on the market as H. 'Geisha' is not what he registered."

An article about the cultivar H. 'Yae-no-oba' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2001 Vol. 32 No. 2)  states that, "This cultivar is a selection of H. plantaginea 'Aphrodite' growing in Ralph "Herb" Benedict's garden...according to Ron Williams of House of Hosta in Green Bay, Wisconsin, who introduced it, is a "vast improvement over H. plantaginea 'Aphrodite' as it blooms profusely each year"...(Pollock continues) I've also found that these H. plantaginea plants flower better if the weather is hot: in the upper 80s and higher along with high night temperatures...."Yae" means "to have two of something" in Japanese, in other words "double"..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 1) states that, "I asked Bob Solberg...for an explanation of the cultivar's name." H. 'Korean Snow'," he said, "was named after the origin of its H. yingeri heritage and its unique misted variegation pattern, similar but different from Vaughn's 'snow flurry' pattern."...Bill Meyer...points out that, "
what is most unusual about the leaves of H. 'Korean Snow' is the stability of the streaking. Only occasionally do bits of margin or edge or even solid-color areas, form. Supposedly this highly stable streaking will be passed on to its offspring. Also, as to be expected, some leaves tend to be more green than white, others more white than green. Coloring is most striking in early spring."...The blooms are small and dainty, airily spaced completely around strong, thin upright stems." Spider" or "spidery" is the term used to describe the shape of these flower petals."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 1) quotes Steve Hottovy "Hosta 'Eola Salad Bowl' is a chance seedling...grown from mixed seed I purchased from Walden West in Scotts Mills, Oregon in 1985...The batch of seedlings showed great diversity. In 1987 I selected a small one from among them and gave it to Monrovia. At the time I was propagator for Monrovia of Dayton, Oregon...Several people remarked that it looked like a salad ready to eat, due to the leaf color, size and wavy appearance. So it was dubbed 'Salad Bowl'. 'Eola' is the name of the Willamette valley hills around my house..."

An article about H. 'Sheila Macqueen' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 1) states that, "This hosta was registered as H. 'Sheila Maqueen'...However, the spelling of the family name is incorrect...The correct spelling is Macqueen...The correction has been made in the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum registry (of The American Hosta Society )...Sheila Macqueen is a world-renowned English floral arranger who lives in Herfordshire, U.K....one of the first professional flower arrangers to use hosta leaves...there is a permanent tribute at Long Branch in Millwood, Virginia, called "The Sheila Macqueen Gardens at Historic Long Branch"..."

An article about H. 'Allegan Fog' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "This hosta is an introduction of Ken Herrema of Englerth Nursery in Hopkins, Michigan. 'Allegan Fog' is named after Allegan County where this nursery is located. Other hostas from this nursery, started by the late Larry Englerth, also have Allegan in their names. In 2000, Peter Ruh...registered three hostas for Ken Herrema: 'Allegan Fog', 'Allegan Emperor' and 'Allegan Gent'."

An article about H. 'Wylde Green Cream' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "...the introducers...live on Wylde Green Road..."

An article about H. 'Ginsu Knife' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that, "Quite possibly this seedling of Bob Solberg...is the best new 2002 introduction...according to Solberg, ...it has taken us almost 15 years from seed to shipping to get this hosta to you. It is one of those hostas that, as soon as it came out of the ground as a seedling, caught my eye, not because it was incredibly beautiful but because it was incredibly weird."

An article about H. 'Zuzu's Petals' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2002 Vol. 33 No. 2) states that the cultivar names  "...are from the 1946 American classic movie, It's a Wonderful Life, starring Jimmy Stewart...Zuzu is the name of the daughter of George Bailey, the character that Stewart plays."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2003 Vol. 34 No. 1) states that, "H. pycnophylla, the pollen parent of 'Cutting Edge', was named by Dr. Fumio Maekawa in 1976...The green leaves which can be as large as 8 inches long by 7 inches wide at maturity, have slightly rippled margins and white undersides -- from which 'Cutting Edge' gets its principal handsome attributes.

An article about name changes by W. George Schmid in The Hosta Journal (2004 Vol. 35 No.3) says, "The first change affecting the genus Hosta is that Hosta sieboldii 'Albomarginata' is now the correct name for the hosta originally known as H. sieboldii 'Sieboldii' (and later by the name Hosta sieboldii 'Paxton's Original')."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) quotes Bob Solberg saying, "H. 'Five O'clock Somewhere' comes from H. 'Five O'clock Shadow'. The Jimmy Buffet and Alan Jackson song, It's Five O'clock Somewhere was a huge hit when I was seeking a name for this sport."

An article  by Warren I. Pollock about changes to the International Code for the Nomenclature of Cultivated Plants in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 1) says, "The proper names are now H. 'Mikawa-no-yuki' instead of 'Mikawa-no-Yuki', 'Otome-no-ka' instead of 'Otome-no-Ka' and 'Seto-no-aki' instead of 'Seto-no-Aki'...'Mikawa-no-yuki' which means "snow of Mikawa"..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 2) says, "Certainly 'Teeny-weenie Bikini' is both an odd looking and oddly spelled epithet. Certainly the hyphen or lowercase w, or both, will foul up some folks."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2006 Vol. 37 No. 2) says, "...'Christmas Candy'...a new hosta discovered by Gert van Eijk-Bos in tissuce-culturing 'Night before Christmas'...at the Vitro Westland propagation laboratory in Rijswijk, Holland...How do 'Christmas Candy', 'Night before Christmas' and the old timer 'White Christmas' compare?...all three have pure white leaf centers and dark green leaf borders."

A summary of Pollock's comparisons of 'Christmas Candy' (CC), 'Night before Christmas' (NbC) and 'White Christmas' (WC) included:

  • Width of green margin: NbC - widest  CC - mid   WC - narrowest
  • Clump height: NbC - tallest  CC - mid  WC - shortest
  • Upright growth habit:  NbC and CC more upright than WC
  • Resistance to melting out (leaf substance): CC - thick substance may be a tetraploid - NbC somewhat resistant - WC often damaged

An article titled H. 'Lapdance' versus H. 'Lap Dance' by Joshua Spece in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No.2) pointed out that Greg Johnson registered a hosta called H. 'Lap Dance' in 2004. It is a miniature seedling of H. 'Happiness' with narrow leaves that grow vertically. The color is blue-green with a lighter blue-green center. A sport of H. 'Striptease' from Steve Karbula has been given the name H. 'Lapdance'. The registered version is the officially accepted name and H. 'Lapdance' would probably have to be renamed before registration.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No. 2) quotes W. George Schmid: "H. 'Tsugaru Komachi' ('The Little Maiden from Tsugaru')...is variegated but unstable. Though [the green form] is most commonly known by 'Aoba Komachi' [Ao means "green" and Aoba means green leaf], this name may not be specific enough because there are other all-green hostas that look just like the reverted, green form of 'Tsugaru Komachi'...My opinion is it should be 'Aoba Tsugaru Komanchi' to indicate it is specifically the green reversion of 'Tsugaru Komachi'."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No. 2) states that, "H. 'Masquerade' is the...name give to H. venusta 'Variegated'...by Diana Grenfell...From its original name, the implication would be that 'Masquerade' is a sport of H. venusta. Most likely, it is not, believes W. George Schmid ...Possibly 'Masquerade' is a cross of H. sieboldii and H. venusta, with H. sieboldii as the pod parent."

An article by Rob Mortko in The Hosta Journal (2008 Vol. 39 No.3) states that, "This seedling was named 'Xanadu Empress Wu', now shortened to 'Empress Wu'. In case you're wondering, 'Empress Wu' was named in honor of arguably the most powerful and influential woman in world history. She was the only female emperor ever in China, reigning for half a century during the Tang Dynasty...in the 7th century A.D...In many ways, 'Empress Wu' looks just like 'Big John' -- only on steroids. In addition to size, however, it also has some other interesting differences. H. 'Empress Wu' continuously sends up scapes for nearly two months, with an overall bloom time approaching three months. Blooming typically starts in late May, almost a month before 'Big John' ."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 1) states that, "It turns out the green sport of 'Masquerade' was registered twice and with two different names. In 1999 Van Wade...registered this sport as 'Vanessa'...Mark Zilis...informed me that he registered it as 'Munchkin' in 2003."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 1) quoted Steve Chamberlain on his introduction, H. 'Academy Brobdingnagian Viridity', "...it's the largest green hosta from my original cross of (H. sieboldiana × H. montana ) and (H. montana × H. sieboldiana). I've registered only three out of more than 1,000 seedlings I grew to 8-year maturity: H. 'David F. Mahoney' registered in 2002, 'Academy Blue Titan' in 1999 and now 'Academy Brobdingnagian Viridity'...is a silly way of saying "Big Green"...Brobdingnagian is from Jonathon Swift's Gulliver's Travels."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2009 Vol. 40 No. 3) states that the cultivar H. 'L.E.W.' was named by Russ Willar for his wife, Linda Ellen Willar.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) reports that H. 'Banana Puddin' was mistakenly registered as H. 'Banana Pudding' but this has been corrected. Some other hosta names that have dropped the last "g" include 'Cheatin Heart', 'Summer Lovin', 'Rootin Tootin', 'Singin the Blues' and 'Lovin Spoonful'.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) states that the hosta H. 'Early to Rise' which was registered by Randy Goodwin in 2006 was originally called 'First Up'." However, 'First Up' is not acceptable under the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants...could be considered as exaggerating the merits of the plant."

An Editor's note in The Hosta Journal (2010 Vol. 41 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Bill Brincka' is a selection of 'Opipara', but without the virus that plagues many 'Opipara' plants. When Bill Brincka brought his fabulous leaves of the plant he called 'Bill Brincka' to the AHS Convention Hosta Show in Jackson, Michigan, in 1988, it had been feared that all 'Opipara' plants were virus-infected, but his clearly was not."

An article about H. 'Tea at Bettys' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2011 Vol. 42 No. 1) states that, "...Richard Ford, who confirmed the correct cultivar name is Bettys, the name of a restaurant. So correctly, it's 'Tea at Bettys'..."

An article about H. 'Shere Khan' by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 1) states that it was, "Named for its tawny tiger-colored gold like the tiger in Kipling's Jungle Book."

An article about W. George Schmid 's Gosan Series by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2012 Vol. 43 No. 1) states that, "Hosta Hill is the name of George's garden. The Japanese name for hostas is giboshi and the name for hill is san...Gosan is intended to mean "Hosta Hill."..."

An article about hosta names from Mark Zilis by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2013 Vol. 44 No. 1) states that, "I started using Zulu names for a few hostas after the 2010 [soccer] World Cup...Jabulani, which means 'rejoice,' amd Vuvuzela was the name of the horn blown by fans during the World Cup...Uju is a palindrome, a word that reads the same forward and backward. Mark's first choice was another Zulu word with several u vowels in it, but there's some controversy over its English meaning."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2013 Vol. 44 No. 1) states that this cultivar was incorrectly registered in 2011 as 'Double Up' but the correct name 'Doubled Up' (a baseball term) was included in the 2012 Registrations.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2013 Vol. 44 No. 1) states that, "Frank Nyikos...wanted to register the cultivar name H. 'Faux Chihuly' in 2011. Difficulties occurred, so he changed the name to 'Forgery'. Still, 'Faux Chihuly' was registered...The error is corrected in the 2012 Registrations issue...Chihuly's staff...objected to the Faux part of the name..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "H. 'Firn Line' is the Correct Name, not 'Firm....The term is from the Swiss German firn meaning 'last years'...and has to do with the line on a glacier between the white snow on a glacier."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "...information from Dr. Kevin C. Vaughn...suggests that H. 'Bengee' likely is the pollen parent of the popular 'Sum and Substance' ...What made 'Bengee' so interesting and desirable in the 1960s, especially to breeders, was it being the first all-gold 'Tokudama' type." Florence Shaw used it heavily as a parent," Kevin recalled."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "I'm in agreement with what Bob Solberg...expressed at the 2013 Winter Scientific Meeting in the Chicago area: "'Sum and Substance' is the second best name ever for a hosta. Only H. 'Blue Mouse Ears' is better - but just slightly."

An article by Glenn Herold in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "Johnson crossed H. yingeri with 'Sum and Substance' to get 'Old Coot' and 'Jaz'. Both have good substance and shiny leaves."

An article by Glenn Herold in The Hosta Journal  (2014 Vol. 45 No. 1) states that, "As the name laevigata implies, the upper and lower surfaces of the leaves are polished. Also the leaves are longer and narrower and have greater substance than H. yingeri ...also claims the spider flower characteristic, but they are larger than those of H. yingeri ...Unfortunately, H. laevigata is difficult to propagate by seed and hybridize because it does not readily form seed pods."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2014 Vol. 45 No. 2) states that, "Correctly, 'Urajiro Hachijo' should be 'Urajiro Amagi Iwa', registered in 2009. It is the white-backed (urajiro) form of H. longipes var. latifolia having glossy, broad rippled-edged leaves."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No.1) states that, "In 2013, Randy Goodwin...registered H. 'Moolah'. A seedling of H. 'Gaijin' × unknown, it is little with leaves about 3˝ inches long by 2˝ inches wide and mound size about 5 inches high by 12 inches across. The dark green foliage is leathery, cupped and corrugated, with greenish yellow margin that brightens to cream as the season progresses." The article goes on to say that this plant has been mistakenly offered in the trade under the name H. 'Mulah'.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No.1) states that, "In 2010, Dick and Jane Ward ...registered 'Beautiful Dreamer'. It's a seedling from 'Zany Janie'...with medium green leaves having a pure white margin...mound height about 13 inches and width about 20 inches...Stuart Asch...has a hosta he named 'Beautiful Dreamer' (NR). It's a seedling from 'William Lachman'...Asch's description: "This small beauty has outstanding color and variegation. The leaves have great substance and are nicely corrugated. A wide deep-green edge with a golden cream center is a wonderful contrast."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No. 1) states that hosta hybridizer Ron Livingston has changed the name of one of his plants from H. 'Afterglow' aka H. 'After Glow' to H. 'Tremont Afterglow' which he registered in 2013. Walters Gardens registered a plant named H. 'Afterglow' in 2012.

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No.2) states that, "When Jan applied for European Community Plant Breeder's Rights for Hosta 'Princess Amalia' it was rejected. Dutch royal family names are not allowed as names of commercial products...So properly and correctly, H. 'Princess Amalia' should be H. 'Amalia'..."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (2015 Vol. 46 No.2) states that, "Paul registered the hosta in 2005 as 'Gentle Giant', reflecting his appreciation of ice skating and Japanese figure skater Midori Ito...an Olympic medalist and world champion nicknamed "the gentle giant"
 

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