Hosta 'Dick Ward'

This slow growing sport of H. 'Zounds' was named for the hosta hybridizer by the same name, Dr. Dick Ward of Ohio. It was registered by Handy Hatfield of Ohio in 1991. The large size (24 inches high by 50 inches wide) plant has broadly ovate, heavily corrugated foliage that is also wavy and cupped. Very pale lavender flowers bloom from late June into July.

According to The Hostapedia by Mark Zilis (2009), "This is considered to be the best gold-centered H. 'Sieboldiana'-type by many hosta collectors. Unlike the many sports of 'Elegans' and 'Frances Williams', it does not develop spring desiccation burn and makes a magnificent specimen in the shaded garden. It honors a person who has made tremendous contributions to The American Hosta Society over the last twenty-five or so years."

From the Field Guide to Hostas by Mark Zilis (2014), "...introduced to the nursery trade in 1992 at $200 per plant..."A great plant honoring a great man" sums up this plant...forms an abundance of seed pods, but surprisingly no progeny have been registered..."

The New Encyclopedia of Hostas by Diana Grenfell (2009) states: "Slow to establish but well worth the wait...Becomes a brassy yellow if exposed to full sunlight."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1995 Vol. 26 No. 2) states that, "H. 'Dick Ward' is a handsome new cultivar, a sport of gold-leaved 'Zounds' with a wide green border. It was introduced and registered by Handy Hatfield...named for the well-known hosta collector, Dr. Richard Ward of Columbus, Ohio...H. 'Dick Ward'...currently selling for $150 for nice-sized divisions."

An article by Warren I. Pollock in The Hosta Journal (1997 Vol. 28 No. 1) states that, "...'Dick Ward' is an expensive hosta, a prize collector's item. It is division propagated, that is, divisions are separated (cut) from plants growing either in the ground or in a container...'Dick Ward' is in very limited supply."




       


Large, blue-green hostas with a gold/yellow marginal variegation such as H. 'Frances Williams', a medial (center) variegation like H. 'Brother Stefan' or yellow/gold leaf H. seiboldiana related cultivars such as H. 'Golden Sunburst' can make very attractive statements in the garden. Unfortunately, some of this type of hosta suffer from a physiological disorder called "spring desiccation burn".

For some reason, these plants often sustain discoloration and damage to the gold/yellow variegated margin or center of the leaf. Although this does not kill the plant, it does make it unattractive looking later in the season.

We have accumulated sample lists of similar size and color cultivars noted as being Resistant or Susceptible to spring desiccation burn.

 

 
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